An analysis of various viewpoints of what love was

Share via Email Looking for answers in Sofia's central mall, Bulgaria. In an attempt to get to the bottom of the question once and for all, the Guardian has gathered writers from the fields of science, psychotherapy, literature, religion and philosophy to give their definition of the much-pondered word.

An analysis of various viewpoints of what love was

The Shakesperean world is impressed, as a whole, with an unmistakable joy in healthy living.

An analysis of various viewpoints of what love was

This tells habitually as a pervading spirit, a contagious temper, not as a creed put forward, or an example set up. It is as clear in the presentment of Falstaff or lago, as of Horatio or Imogen.

And nowhere is it clearer than in his handling of the relations between men and women. For here Shakespeare's preferences and repugnances are unusually transparent; what pleased him in the ways of lovers and wedded folks he drew again and again, and what repelled him he rarely and only for special reasons drew at all.

Criminal love, of any kind, holds a quite subordinate place in his art; and, on the other hand, if ideal figures are to be found there, it is among his devoted, passionate, but arch and joyous women. It is thus possible to lay down a Shakesperean norm or ideal type of love-relations.

It is most distinct in the mature Comedies, where he is shaping his image of life with serene freedom; but also in the Tragedies, where a Portia or a Desdemona innocently perishes in the web of death.

Even in the Histories it occasionally asserts itself as in Richard II's devoted queen, historically a mere child against the stress of recorded fact. In the earlier Comedies it is approached through various stages of erratic or imperfect forms. And both in Comedy and Tragedy he makes use, though not largely, of other than the 'normal' love for definitely comic or tragic ends.

The present study will follow the plan thus indicated. The first section defines the 'norm. The third traces the gradual approach to the norm in the early Comedies.

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The fourth and fifth sections, finally, discuss the treatment, in Comedy and Tragedy, of Love-types other than the norm. The Shakesperean norm of love, 1 thus understood, may be described somewhat as follows. Love is a passion, kindling heart, brain, and senses alike in natural and happy proportions; ardent but not sensual, tender but not sentimental, pure but not ascetic, moral but not puritanic, joyous but not frivolous, mirthful and witty but not cynical.

His lovers look forward to marriage as a matter of course, and they neither anticipate its rights nor turn their affections elsewhere.

They commonly love at first sight and once for all.

Love as Union

Love-relations which do not contemplate marriage occur rarely and in subordination to other dramatic purposes. Tragedy like that of Gretchen does not attract him. Romeo's amour with Rosalind is a mere foil to his greater passion, Cassio's with Bianca merely a mesh in the network of lago's intrigue; Claudio's with Juliet is the indispensable condition of the plot.

The course of love rarely runs smooth; but rival suitors proposed by parents are quietly resisted or merrily abused, never, even by the gentlest, accepted. Crude young girls like Hermia, delicate-minded women like Desdemona and Imogen, the rapturous Juliet and the homely Anne Page, the discreet Silvia and the naive Miranda, are all at one on this point.

And they all carry the day. The dramatically powerful situations which arise from forced marriage -- as when Ford's Penthea The Broken Heart or Corneille's Chimene Le Cid is torn by the conflict between love and honour -- lie, like this conflict in general, outside Shakespeare's chosen field.So, the third person will say, "Love is blind " while the person in love will not agree when the third person will say u r loving blindly becoz the person in love has got different perception.

On a lighter note Everything depends on Frame of Reference Even Newton's laws of motion. Romeo's views on love change with the objects of his love; at first he merely imitates the Petrarchan lover, but after he sees Juliet, Romeo's passionate nature is awakened.

At the start of the play, Romeo is the Petrarchan lover, suffering with great self-awareness, speaking in oxymorons and other exaggerated phrases--"O brawling love!

Reciprocity is not necessary to Plato's view of love, for the desire is for the object (of Beauty), than for, say, the company of another and shared values and pursuits.

Many in the Platonic vein of philosophy hold that love is an intrinsically higher value than appetitive or physical desire. A cultural identity essay communicates the various viewpoints, cultures, beliefs, religions, customs, and so on of students.

It helps make people more accommodative and inclusive. A Process Analysis Essay. A process analysis essay provides information on an individual process in a step-by-step manner. An Informative Essay. Shakespeare's Treatment of Love and Marriage From Shakespeare's treatment of love & marriage and other essays by C.

H. Herford. London, T. Fisher Unwin, Ltd.

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