An analysis of the movie vertigo by alfred hitchcock

That is, go to a great many places and locales.

An analysis of the movie vertigo by alfred hitchcock

Hansen accompanies Scottie to coroner's inquest Dave McElhatton as the radio announcer alternative ending Fred Graham as Scottie's police partner falls from rooftop Nina Shipman as the girl mistaken for Madeleine at the museum Sara Taft as nun during closing scene Alfred Hitchcock makes his customary cameo appearance walking in the street in a gray suit and carrying a trumpet case.

Themes[ edit ] Charles Barr in his monograph dedicated to the study of Vertigo has stated that the central theme of the film is psychological obsession, concentrating in particular on Scottie as obsessed with the women in his life. As Barr states in his book, "This story of a man who develops a romantic obsession with the image of an enigmatic woman has commonly been seen, by his colleagues as well as by critics and biographers, as one that engaged Hitchcock in an especially profound way; and it has exerted a comparable fascination on many of its viewers.

After first seeing it as a teenager inDonald Spoto had gone back for 26 more viewings by the time he wrote The Art of Alfred Hitchcock in In a magazine article, Geoffrey O'Brien cites other cases of 'permanent fascination' with Vertigo, and then casually reveals that he himself, starting at age 15, has seen it 'at least thirty times'.

Maxfield has suggested[ citation needed ] that Vertigo can be interpreted as a variant on the Ambrose Bierce short story " An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge "and that the main narrative of the film is actually imagined by Scottie, whom we see dangling from a building at the end of the opening rooftop chase.

Development[ edit ] Kim Novak as "Madeleine", who has woken up naked in Scottie's bed after an apparent suicide attempt by drowning. In the book, Judy's involvement in Madeleine's death was not revealed until the denouement.

Vertigo - Opening Scene

At the script stage, Hitchcock suggested revealing the secret two-thirds of the way through the film, so that the audience would understand Judy's mental dilemma. He decided to remove it. Herbert Coleman, Vertigo's associate producer and a frequent collaborator with Hitchcock, felt the removal was a mistake.

However, Hitchcock said, "Release it just like that. The picture's not that important. Coleman reluctantly made the necessary edits. When he received news of this, Paramount head Barney Balaban was very vocal about the edits and ordered Hitchcock to "Put the picture back the way it was.

Hitchcock originally hired playwright Maxwell Anderson to write a screenplay, but rejected his work, which was titled Darkling, I Listen, a quotation from Keats's Ode to a Nightingale. According to Charles Barr in his monograph dedicated to Vertigo, "Anderson was the oldest at 68 [of the 3 writers involved], the most celebrated for his stage work and the least committed to cinema, though he had a joint script credit for Hitchcock's preceding film The Wrong Man.

He worked on adapting the novel during Hitchcock's absence abroad, and submitted a treatment in September Taylor —who was recommended to Hitchcock due to his knowledge of San Francisco— [9] from notes by Hitchcock.

Among Taylor's creations was the character of Midge. She modeled for an early version of the painting featured in the film.

By the time Novak had tied up prior film commitments and a vacation promised by Columbia Picturesthe studio that held her contract, Miles had given birth and was available for the film. Hitchcock proceeded with Novak, nevertheless. Filming[ edit ] Initial on-site principal photography[ edit ] Vertigo was filmed from September to December In the driving scenes shot in the city, the main characters' cars are almost always pictured heading down the city's steeply inclined streets.

Such a tour is featured in a subsection of Chris Marker 's documentary montage Sans Soleil. Associate producer Herbert Coleman's daughter Judy Lanini suggested the mission to Hitchcock as a filming location.

A steeple, added sometime after the mission's original construction and secularization, had been demolished following a fire, so Hitchcock added a bell tower using scale models, matte paintingsand trick photography at the Paramount studio in Los Angeles.

The tower's staircase was later assembled inside a studio.

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List of shooting locations[ edit ] Scottie's apartment Lombard Street is one block downhill from the "crookedest street in the world". The facade of the building remained mostly intact untilwhen the owner of the property erected a wall enclosing the entrance area on the Lombard side of the building.

An analysis of the movie vertigo by alfred hitchcock

The original tower was much smaller and less dramatic than the film's version.Thriller and Suspense Films: These are types of films known to promote intense excitement, suspense, a high level of anticipation, ultra-heightened expectation, uncertainty, anxiety, and nerve-wracking tension.

Thriller and suspense films are virtually synonymous and interchangeable categorizations, with similar characteristics and . Rhik Samadder: The trouble with being the best movie of all time is that Vertigo is now an easy target for criticism.

Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. With Ingrid Bergman, Gregory Peck, Michael Chekhov, Leo G. Carroll. A psychiatrist protects the identity of an amnesia patient accused of murder while attempting to recover his memory.

An analysis of the movie vertigo by alfred hitchcock

She had pretended to be Madeleine to fool Scottie, and use him as a witness to lend credence to the idea that Madeleine was mentally unstable. Gavin had known about his vertigo, and knew that Scottie would never make it to the top of the bell tower.

Alfred Hitchcock's Vertigo is a film which functions on multiple levels simultaneously. On a literal level it is a mystery-suspense story of a man hoodwinked into acting as an accomplice in a murder, his discovery of the hoax, and the unraveling of the threads of the murder plot.

Mar 28,  · In this article I will show how certain elements of mise-en-scene and editing contribute to the theme of Vertigo (), by Alfred Hitchcock. These cinematic techniques will be pointed out in chronological order, with the focus on what I believe to be the best use of them in each benjaminpohle.coms: 5.

Vertigo (film) - Wikipedia